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Sharing the art of inner communication through sound experience

The human impulse towards music is rooted so deep that its true role is in the composition of life itself. This is the art of listening to reality and becoming capable of directing its expression in one’s own experience, for happiness, health, prosperity and fulfilment. The sound of emotion is the raw material of life’s music, and 500 years ago a master of this art, Guru Nanak, discovered a key to access it in the Indian raag system. 

Latest News



Sikh Musical Heritage: A Documentary on Sikh Music
Sikh Musical Heritage: The Untold Story - a community project archiving the legacy of Sikh music.   Read more..



Gurmat Sangeet Camp in United Kingdom
Come join us for a two-day camp in UK on Gurmat Sangeet and Sikh music.   Read more..

Guru Nanak broke the bond between spiritual reality and religion, teaching people from all backgrounds and simply calling them Sikhs, meaning students. It was not the intention to create a religion, and it was only centuries later that ‘Sikhism’ as an institution was imposed.

Raj Academy follows the path of practical wisdom revealed by Guru Nanak, enabling people from any walk of life to attain wellbeing and success through this conscious application of sound, which is called Naad Yoga, Sikh music or Gurmat Sangeet in different contexts. We teach across the world, including the UK, Germany, Spain, France, USA and Canada. 

Please click on the links to find out more about the many ways you can take part in our activities. We share this valuable teaching for the benefit of all, with no expectation of existing skill, to allow the composition of as many beautiful lives as possible into the future.

Sikh Music Documentary

Sikh Musical Heritage - The Untold Story

Sikh musical heritage is a colorful and rich tradition with creativity at its heart, but for a practical purpose. Sikh music, also commonly known as Kirtan or Gurmat Sangeet, is the foundation for the Sikh way of life.

The tradition of Kirtan in Sikhi started with Guru Nanak Dev ji, who used it as a tool to communicate internally between mind and soul; Kirtan was also used for external communication with people from all walks of life across diverse cultures.

Our primary aim for this documentary on Sikh music is to share the importance of Kirtan in every Sikh’s life and preserve our rich musical heritage.

The documentary will reveal extensive academic and community based research carried out over the past few years – research that uncovers an untold story of what Kirtan is, why it is important and why Guru Nanak Dev ji used Kirtan as a means of communication.

Through this documentary project, we want to create a high quality visual account of historic events in the field of Sikh music, from its introduction in Sikhi with Guru Nanak to its evolution over the years.

We aim also to bring forward factual evidence to provide an unbiased record of a few key episodes that will bring light to certain aspects lost from our musical heritage through British influence in the 18th and 19th centuries. This will allow us to share a part of our history that has been not only overlooked but also forgotten.

So please join us in this community effort to revive and preserve Sikh musical heritage, as we set out on this journey together to discover historic events that have influenced Sikh music and brought it to what we know today.

We recognize as a community that there is a vast need for education on critical topics such as Kirtan to reveal the Sikh way of life as practiced during the time of Sikh Gurus. However, no such project has been undertaken to date that aims to close this educational gap.

Although we may have heard the names of string and percussion instruments from Sikh musical heritage such as Dilruba, Saranda, Rabab, Sarangi, Taus, Jori and Pakhawaj, we are provided with neither their contextual importance nor the reason for their disappearance from society. We wish to answer these questions for a wider audience so that as a community, we can better understand one of the most vital aspects of Sikh history and its connection to our practice of Sikhi today.

Professor Surinder Singh has dedicated his life to the field of sustaining and sharing the art of Sikh music. It is through his passionate hard work and research that this project has been made possible. The information it will make known is critical to connecting the bridge between past and present as we all build a brighter future.

If we forget to appreciate what has been blessed to us, we will continue to lose more of our valuable heritage. If we become aware of what was taken from us and what we are losing, we can work together to preserve a crucial element of our heritage.

Shooting for the Sikh music documentary began in spring 2015. Shooting is in India, the United Kingdom and the United States. Our aim is to complete the project by Fall 2015 in preparation for its first screening at the Sikhlens Film Festival in California in November 2015.

Upon the screening of the documentary at several other film festivals across the world, we intend to submit it to TV channels, after which the documentary will be made available to the wider community. 

Please extend your support by donating to the project and share the details with your family and friends. We thank you for your generous support.

If you have any questions about the documentary project, please contact Preetinder Singh at preetinder@rajacademy.com.